Technology


Technology Key Stage 3

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

Our students are encouraged to take on more accountability for their own learning to support development of key independent learning skills required of them in Further Education or Employment.

  • Attend the extra-curricular clubs which run in the Curriculum Area – Y7 Textiles Club, Y8 Textiles Club and KS3 Technology Club.
  • Keep a scrap book of things that inspire them in terms of crafts.
  • Make textile and technology items at home, or in a suitable craft setting.
  • Look out for and join creative workshops that are run in the school holidays.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

www.mistermaker.com
www.bbc.co.uk/education
www.textileshotline.co.uk
www.technologystudent.com

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Take an active interest in your son's or daughter's project work.
  • Provide opportunities to visit a wide range of museums, art galleries, exhibitions, etc.
  • Including them in everyday shopping activities – clothes shopping (looking at fibre content); conscientious shopping – asking questions 'Why is that so inexpensive?' Check labels for countries of manufacture - 'Do you think their workers get paid much?' Looking at product packaging in the supermarket questioning 'Is it necessary?' 'How could you improve that?'
  • Allowing your son or daughter to practise their skills if there is access to a workshop environment at home or with extended family.

Technology Key Stage 4

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

Our students are encouraged to take on more accountability for their own learning to support development of key independent learning skills required of them in Further Education or Employment.

  • Enter Young Designer competitions - www.youngfashiondesigneruk.com (Textiles & Fashion)
  • Keep a design inspiration sketch/scrap book for both Textiles and D&T – collect images of interesting product ideas/themes/new technologies; research Fashion/Product designers (current and past) to help build a wider knowledge in addition to class work.
  • Keep track of industry led exhibitions – catwalks, expos, product launches (Apple, Samsung, etc.) – keep a record in your scrap book; does this happen yearly or one offs? This will help build your industry knowledge especially if there are career possibilities.
  • Create your own Design Portfolio – create your own briefs or use any of the following:
    • Next are looking for an innovative range of lighting for their children's bedroom range. Using the theme of Space, create several designs that could be sold by Next.
    • A restaurant is improving their outdoor seating area and want to commission a table and chair set that is individual to them and reflects their surroundings (this will include a water garden and decorative lighting. They are very ethical and are keen to make sure that the design is sustainable.
    • All Saints are looking to expand their range of clothing to include Children's wear – using their key on-edge style, design a range of Children's wear that is both in-keeping with their style yet age-appropriate.
    • You are applying to an Art College to study Fashion – design a range of one-off pieces that show your talent and creativity.

What wider reading can be completed to support the curriculum?

Resistant Materials:

Textiles:

  • Selvedge/Elle/Vogue magazines.
  • The Sunday Times Style Magazine supplement.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

Resistant Materials:

www.technologystudent.com
www.design-technology.org
www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology
www.designmuseum.org

Textiles:

www.textileshotline.co.uk
www.ftmlondon.org - (Fashion & Textiles Museum).
www.vam.ac.uk - (V&A Museum).
www.designersnexus.com

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Take an active interest in your son's or daughter's project work.
  • Allow them to practise their skills if you have access to a workshop environment at home or with extended family.
  • Provide opportunities to visit a wide range of museums, art galleries, exhibitions, etc.
  • Including them in everyday shopping activities – clothes shopping (looking at fibre content); conscientious shopping – asking questions 'Why is that so inexpensive?' Check labels for countries of manufacture - 'Do you think their workers get paid much?' Looking at product packaging in the supermarket questioning 'Is it necessary?' 'How could you improve that?'
  • Investigate exhibitions such as the Great British Sewing Bee Live: www.thegreatbritishsewingbeelive.com
  • Investigate The British Style Collective (the old clothes show live): www.britishstylecollective.com
  • Investigate The Knitting and Stitching Show: www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com

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Tollbar Academy Principal

Stephen Moon
MSc.

Tollbar MAT Chief Executive

David J Hampson
OBE, BSc, BA.
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