History


History Key Stage 3

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

  • Produce their best entry for the Inter-house History competition – it runs every year.
  • Attend History Club at lunch time.
  • Challenge themselves by completing the additional homework projects available for each unit of work.
  • Create a revision guide for the unit of work that they are studying.
  • Create a glossary of new vocabulary that they acquire during History lessons.
  • Take a lead role in teaching key concepts and ideas to others during lessons.
  • Challenge themselves to complete more 'hot' homework or complete a wider range of homework tasks from the takeaway menu.
  • Try to use higher order concepts to make links to topics studied at primary school.
  • Find out more about the era being studied – what were the fashions like? What entertainment existed? What were houses like?
  • Create a scrapbook on local history.
  • Watch historical films and read historical novels. Try to critically evaluate how accurate they may be.
  • Speak to older generations about the past – ask them how society has changed.
  • Create your own multi-media videos about an aspect of history that really interests you.

What wider reading can be completed to support the curriculum?

The following texts may be of interest:

  • Encyclopaedia Britannica could assist in exploring topics fully.
  • Read the 'Bygone' section of the Grimsby Telegraph (or look it up on the internet) to learn about the history of our local area.
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas - John Boyne.
  • Goodnight Mr Tom - Michelle Magorian.
  • The Eagle of the Ninth - Rosemary Sutcliffe.
  • Conn Iggulden novels.
  • Bernard Cornwell novels.
  • Private Peaceful - Michael Morpurgo.
  • War Horse - Michael Morpurgo.
  • The Machine Gunners - Robert Westall.
  • Horrible Histories.
  • Carrie's War - Nina Bawden.
  • Wave Me Goodbye - Jacqueline Wilson.
  • Eliza Rose - Lucy Worsley.
  • D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

www.bbc.co.uk/education
www.bbc.co.uk/history/forkids
www.horrible-histories.co.uk
www.historyforkids.net
www.havefunwithhistory.com
www.activehistory.co.uk

Can television and film assist with supporting the curriculum?

Certain television programmes can be useful:

  • Use Channel 4 On Demand and BBC iPlayer to find historical documentaries.
  • The History Channel.
  • Watch programmes on Yesterday.
  • MrGreen1066 on YouTube.

Watching films such as:

  • Goodnight Mr Tom.
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas.
  • Christmas Truce.
  • Pompeii (12).
  • The Sound of Music.
  • Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.
  • The Great Escape.

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Discuss and debate current affairs, and try to find links back to historical events.
  • Research your family tree.
  • Take your child to a museum, or discuss buildings of historical significance in the local area.
  • Discuss students' homework and classwork – getting them to explain and justify the judgements they make.
  • Ask your child to teach you about an aspect of history that they are learning about.
  • Ask your child to act out an important historical event/moment for you.
  • Encourage students to use the local library in order to access a wider range of historical reading material, or to access newspaper archives.
  • Visit places of historical interest when the opportunity arises. This could be locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Examples of places to visit include: National Fishing Heritage Centre in Grimsby, Lincoln Castle, Lincoln Cathedral, Hull's Museums Quarter, Clifford's Tower in York, Jorvik Museum, York Dungeon, Eden Camp, Beamish, The Tower of London, Windsor Castle, Warwick Castle - the opportunities are endless!
  • Visit National Trust properties and English Heritage sites.
  • Whilst on holiday, make an effort to find out about the history of the area that you are visiting.
  • Go to the theatre or cinema to watch a historical play or film.

History Key Stage 4

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

  • Attend after Academy revision sessions.
  • Challenge themselves by completing the additional homework projects available for each unit of work.
  • Create a revision guide for the unit of work that they are studying.
  • Create a glossary of new vocabulary that they acquire during History lessons.
  • Take a lead role in teaching key concepts and ideas to others during lessons.
  • Ask teachers for access to past exam papers/sample questions and answers.
  • Create their own multi-media videos about an aspect of history that really interests you.
  • Watch historical films and read historical novels. Try to critically evaluate how accurate they may be.
  • Speak to older generations about the past – ask them how society has changed.

What wider reading can be completed to support the curriculum?

The following texts may be of interest:

  • Read History Today magazine.
  • Purchase additional textbooks/revision guides to read more widely on the subjects you are learning about.
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica could assist in exploring topics fully.
  • Read newspapers and search for articles about important historical events.
  • The Man in the High Castle - Philip K Dick.
  • Hitler - Ian Kershaw.
  • The Book Thief - Markus Zusak.
  • Every Man Dies Alone - Hans Fallada.
  • Bernard Cornwell novels.
  • War Horse - Michael Morpurgo.
  • Private Peaceful - Michael Morpurgo.
  • Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl.
  • Day of the Assassins - Johnny O'Brien.
  • Number the Stars - Lois Lowry.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

www.bbc.co.uk/education
www.johndclare.net
www.spartacus-educational.com
www.aqa.org.uk
www.activehistory.co.uk
www.thestudentroom.co.uk
www.explaininghistory.com
www.schoolhistory.co.uk
www.historylearningsite.co.uk
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
www.historytoday.com

Can television and film assist with supporting the curriculum?

Certain television programmes can be useful:

  • Use Channel 4 On Demand and BBC iPlayer to find historical documentaries.
  • The History Channel.
  • Watch programmes on Yesterday.
  • The Last Kingdom (15).
  • Blackadder.
  • 1066: A Year to Conquer England.
  • Ancient Warriors - The Normans & The Vikings.
  • Watch documentaries on the topics we are studying and other areas of history, e.g. David Starkey's Days that Shook the World series.
  • MrGreen1066 on YouTube.

Watching films such as:

  • Schindler's List.
  • Valkyrie.
  • Swing Kids.
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas.
  • Hitler: The Rise of Evil.
  • Band of Brothers (15).
  • Hope and Glory (15).
  • The Diary of Anne Frank.
  • War Horse.
  • Suffragette.
  • All Quiet on the Western Front.
  • Race.
  • Selma.
  • The Great Escape.

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Discuss and debate current affairs, and try to find links back to historical events.
  • Research your family tree.
  • Take your son or daughter to a museum, or discuss buildings of historical significance in the local area.
  • Discuss your son's or daughter's homework and classwork – getting them to explain and justify the judgements they make.
  • Ask your son or daughter to teach you about an aspect of history that they are learning about.
  • Encourage students to use the local library in order to access a wider range of historical reading material, or to access newspaper archives.
  • Visit places of historical interest when the opportunity arises. This could be locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Examples of places to visit include: National Fishing Heritage Centre in Grimsby, Lincoln Castle, Lincoln Cathedral, Hull's Museums Quarter, Clifford's Tower in York, Jorvik Museum, York Dungeon, Eden Camp, Beamish, The Tower of London, Windsor Castle, Warwick Castle - the opportunities are endless!
  • Visit National Trust properties and English Heritage sites.
  • Whilst on holiday, make an effort to find out the history of the area that you are visiting.
  • Visit a museum.
  • Go to the theatre or cinema to watch a historical play or film.
  • Listen to Radio 4 discussions and debates on historical topics.

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Tollbar Academy Principal

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