Geography


Geography Key Stage 3

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

  • Get involved in Geography Club.
  • Create a revision guide for the unit of work that they are studying.
  • Create a glossary of new vocabulary that they acquire during Geography lessons.
  • Take a lead role in teaching key concepts and ideas to others during lessons.
  • Try to make links between geographical theory and ideas and places that they have studied.
  • Read and use maps when visiting places outside of the Academy.
  • Watch the news and keeping up to date with current events and their link to Geography.

What wider reading can be completed to support the curriculum?

  • Students could read and critically evaluate the presentation of Geography within any national newspapers.
  • Students could keep a 'Geography in the News' scrapbook – printing off or cutting out any stories they hear about that are related to Geography.
  • Equally, on holiday, they could similar scrapbook about the human and physical environment of the place.

The following texts may be of interest:

  • Read the Horrible Geographies series.
  • Familiarisation and use of atlases.
  • Using encyclopaedias/country fact file books.
  • Reading of world fact books.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

www.metoffice.gov.uk
www.earth.google.co.uk
www.earthfromtheair.com
www.geographypods.com
www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/mapzone
www.bbc.co.uk/education
www.usgs.gov
www.youtube.com - YouTube account for Mr Parr for Geographical songs.

Can television and film assist with supporting the curriculum?

Certain television programmes can be useful:

  • Planet Earth (BBC).
  • Coast series (BBC2).
  • Search Dr Iain Stewart in YouTube for tectonics and processes.
  • Watch the news for stories with a geographical connection
  • Various BBC documentaries by Simon Reeve, covering both physical and human geographical themes.

Watching films such as:

  • Ice Age: Continental Drift.
  • Madagascar.
  • The Day After Tomorrow.
  • Dante's Peak.
  • The Jungle Book.

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Discuss and debate current affairs, particularly issues related directly to Geography.
  • Discuss geographical events/festivals that are taking place, e.g. music festivals, carnivals, sporting events.
  • Encourage your son or daughter to explain their own views on a range of geographical issues, but also encourage them to reflect on why others may not share these views.
  • Support your son or daughter with additional knowledge linked to homework (i.e. what you know, your opinion, how things have changed?)
  • Visit places of geographical interest, either locally (e.g. Lincolnshire Wolds, Hubbard's Hills, Rimac Saltmarsh, Hull) or further afield (e.g. Dorset coastline, The Eden Project, Brimham Rocks, London, Leeds, etc).
  • When on holiday, take note of human and physical environments such as coastal processes, cultural behaviour and transport systems).
  • Look for evidence of Geography where you might not expect to find it, e.g. sporting rivalries, museums, adverts, music and art.
  • Encourage your son or daughter to investigate or join a conservation organisation, e.g. WWF, Woodland Trust, Surfers Against Sewage.

Geography Key Stage 4

What can students do to develop their skills in this subject area?

  • Attend after Academy revision sessions.
  • Do additional research about the case studies provided in the revision guide.
  • Create a revision guide for the unit of work that they are studying.
  • Create a glossary of new vocabulary that they acquire during Geography lessons.
  • Take a lead role in teaching key concepts and ideas to others during lessons.
  • Try to make links to between geographical theory and ideas and places that they have studied.
  • Ask teachers for access to past exam papers/sample questions and answers.
  • Read and use maps when visiting places.
  • Watch the news and keep up to date with current events and their link to Geography.
  • Enhance maths skills that link to Geography by applying ideas from maths lessons and putting them into a Geographical context.

What wider reading can be completed to support the curriculum?

  • Students could read and critically evaluate the presentation of Geography within any national newspapers.
  • Students could keep a 'Geography in the news' scrapbook – printing off or cutting out any stories they hear about that are related to Geography.
  • Equally, on holiday, they could similar scrapbook about the human and physical environment of the place.

The following texts may be of interest:

  • Reading the Horrible Geographies series.
  • AQA textbooks and revision guides.
  • Atlases
  • Encyclopaedias/country fact file books.

What websites could students visit to support the curriculum?

www.nhm.ac.uk
www.rgs.org
www.ready.gov/volcanoes
www.fema.gov
www.usgs.gov
www.metoffice.gov.uk
www.environment-agency.gov.uk
www.100people.org
www.oxfam.org.uk
www.cia.gov
www.nhc.noaa.gov
www.earth.google.co.uk
www.earthfromtheair.com
ww2.defra.gov.uk
www.gapminder.org
www.coolgeography.co.uk
www.aqa.org.uk
www.cia.gov
www.geographypods.com
www.youtube.com - YouTube account for Mr Parr for Geographical songs.

Can television and film assist with supporting the curriculum?

Certain television programmes can be useful:

  • Planet Earth (BBC).
  • Coast series (BBC2).
  • Kevin Mcleod Slumming it (Channel 4).
  • Search Dr Iain Stewart in YouTube for tectonics and processes.
  • An Inconvenient Truth (Climate Change).
  • Various BBC documentaries by Simon Reeve, covering both physical and human geographical themes.
  • Watch the news for stories with a geographical connection.
  • Countryfile.

Watching films such as:

  • The Impossible.
  • The Day After Tomorrow.
  • 2012.
  • San Andreas.
  • Slumdog Millionaire.
  • Flood.
  • Dante's Peak.

How can parents/carers help and what can be done at home?

  • Discuss and debate current affairs, particularly issues related directly to Geography, e.g. EU referendum, geopolitical debates.
  • Discuss geographical events/festivals that are taking place, e.g. music festivals, carnivals, sporting events.
  • Encourage students to explain their own views on a range of geographical issues, but also encourage them to reflect on why others may not share these views.
  • Support students with additional knowledge linked to homework (i.e. what you know, your opinion, how things have changed?)
  • Encourage students to use road maps when planning a journey rather than a satellite navigation system.
  • Visit places of Geographical interest, either locally (e.g. Lincolnshire Wolds, Hubbard's Hills, Rimac Saltmarsh, Hull) or further afield (e.g. Dorset coastline, The Eden Project, Brimham Rocks, London, Leeds, etc.).
  • When on holiday, take note of human and physical environments such as coastal processes, cultural behaviour and transport systems).
  • Look for evidence of Geography where you might not expect to find it, e.g. sporting rivalries, museums, adverts, music and art.
  • Find out about or join a conservation organisation, e.g. WWF, Woodland Trust, Surfers Against Sewage.

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